What Aurora host supervisors say

Below are some quotes from Aurora intern supervisors highlighting some of the most rewarding aspects of hosting Aurora interns.

  • "Thank you for sending us another brilliant Aurora intern. She has assembled a very compelling Yawuru Cultural Induction production which will be soon delivered to industry and government agencies. She is the 7th Aurora intern I have supervised at Yawuru since early 2011 and all have been high quality. I feel privileged to have been part of the embryonic discussions about the Aurora Project and watch it grow to make such a valuable contribution to Indigenous development in Australia."
  • "Interns are very valuable."
  • "We really appreciate being able to discuss, research and work through ideas with the interns. They bring an intelligent, considered perspective from outside our organisation, with the benefit of up to date knowledge from their fields of study."
  • "The eagerness and energy of the interns to perform tasks quickly and efficiently, to learn and employ personal initiative."
  • "Having an intern also allows the team to reflect on their own experience and direction, and offers a reminder about the way the organisation is valued more broadly and the importance of the work undertaken."
  • "It also provides a good opportunity to skill someone up in the value of human rights and equal opportunity as it applies to the 'real world'. On a practical level, teaching someone about a system of work provides staff with an opportunity to reflect on, and improve, processes and practice."
  • "Interns are willing to assist with any task regardless of whether it was technically challenging or mundane."
  • "We always enjoy working with uni grads – they bring fresh ideas and no baggage."
  • "The opportunity to encourage and stimulate and challenge a young person."
  • "Having such comprehensive research and analysis completed as well as having an intelligent, self-motivated and personable intern work in the Unit was very rewarding."
  • "It is a useful and enlightening means of finding new staff; training up others in the sorts of experiences they will have at other places, and; getting some extra work done within the section. There is value for both parties."
  • "Very intelligent, receptive, collaborative, responsive, courteous, respectful, fast learning, high quality interns – so nice to meet enthusiastic people."
  • "I would like to express my thanks and that of our NTRB for the good work you do in supporting NTRB’s in their work. The internship program is both time consuming and rewarding. The past few interns have been particularly good both in terms of their work and their ability to fit in with the organisation and the demands of a busy workplace in an NTRB. They are very well prepared (to do anything) and have fitted in with the work and the team very well."
  • "We consider internships to be a valuable way to skill up the team and reflect on our own systems of work, as well as provide valuable practical experience to interns in the application of the knowledge and skills developed throughout the student's degree course. It is also a valuable way to promote the possibility of policy and legal work in the areas of human rights and equal opportunity.
  • "Working with young people committed to Human Rights and Indigenous issues."​​​​
  • "The work that you do, really changes lives, not just on a personal level (for the intern), but through ripples and impact they have with the wider community through the work your host organisations do."
  • "Irrespective of what you give us, it was more than when you arrived...we're happy for any help you can offer us". 
  • "Thank you for your contribution. You fitted in easily and picked up the pace really quickly and with enthusiasm and optimism. The success of the forum is due in part to the great work you did. We would have you back anytime!"
  • "One of the successes of the Program which I have always felt was of critical importance was the program's role in sensitising young lawyers to the issues facing Indigenous families and communities. Whether they practice on behalf of Indigenous people or otherwise, having that understanding among many of the future leaders of the country is critical to our national future."
  • The improved relationships between the two interns and Nulungu Research Institute has been an excellent result of the program. Both Indigenous fundeded interns are PhD students with Nulungu, who are in the early stages of their PhD studies. The program has been valuable in ways we could not have foreseen. Apart from the work they achieved during their internships, I think an important outcome - from my perspective - was the 'inclusion' of the two women into Nulungu as Nulungu researchers. Going forward into their PhD programs, both women are now very much integral to the workings of Nulungu, rather than being 'students'. They ARE Nulungu researchers - and people in the University and in the community recognise that.