What Indigenous interns say

This was a valuable, rewarding, well-rounded and enlightening educational experience which showed me that a legal career can be about more than just black letter law; it can be about empowering the community and building relationships.  Indigenous cultural and intellectual property (ICIP) was a fascinating and challenging area of law to experience. I was excited to learn from someone so well regarded and I learnt a great deal under her mentorship.  My time at on placement taught me a key truth: everything in this area of law has to do with people and what motivates them. The law can be used to empower your clients to achieve their dreams, and to fight for their rights when the chips are down.

Sasha Purcell, Terri Janke

It was a very welcoming environment at KCLS and it was so rewarding to get good outcomes for the clients. It was great to develop friendships and work relationships that are meaningful.

Kira Clark, KCLS

It was such a fantastic experience. The people who I worked alongside the entire time I was there, were so generous with their time, treated me like a fellow worker, and allowed me to grow so much over the five and a half weeks. I will definitely be staying in touch with all of them and I'm looking forward to working with them in the future, hopefully on one of my own projects.

Julia Moriarty, Lingo Pictures

The Cultural Unit has enabled me to see the strength and power that culture can have in government organisations, as well as allowing me to further develop my knowledge and understanding of Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander culture. This opportunity has truly been a substantial experience that exceeded my expectations and one that allowed me to reflect on my future career direction.

Jessica Laing, YJ

This experience has had a significant impact on myself by strengthening my passions to give back to community, to foster the excellence of our young people, and to be active in the development of our future leaders and change makers. It was also a really enriching experience personally as I was able to come to a greater sense of my Indigeneity through knowledge-sharing with the students.

Paris Mordecai, FYA

As an Aboriginal person, I have a passion for working with Aboriginal people, giving back to my community and working to make a difference. I feel privileged to have had the opportunity to learn more about my culture, my country, my language and develop as a person. I have always been proud of my culture but have never felt ‘truly Indigenous’ because of my skin colour. I believe this experience has benefited me professionally as it has reaffirmed my pride and that I am Indigenous, which I believe will help me to relate to my Indigenous patients. My supervisor has really inspired me as a role model and I look forward to making a difference in my field.

Allison Morgan, WGN

I experienced many firsts including the highs of bringing people back to life and the lows of suicide and fatal MVA’s.  Along the way St Johns continually providing essential peer support services to our entire team.   It has been a hugely surreal journey to have experienced but one I continue to reflect on.   

Carrington Bond, St John Ambulance

I could not be any more stoked on the experiences and knowledge I was privileged of gaining over summer. The Aurora program internships are absolutely fantastic! A very rewarding, and educational experience!

Brielle Long, Chatham

I really enjoyed working in Family Law team & they were a fantastic group of individuals. I learnt a great deal about how the Family Law sector worked, how much impact the Department of Child Safety known as DCP in Western Australia has on the lives of Indigenous people & what that has meant for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders people not just in Western Australia but Australia in general.

Fiona Middleton-Gala, Social Work intern, ALSWA

I learnt a lot about native title and the people represented in a short period of time. It gave me ideas about employment opportunities both in and outside of native title, valuable contacts, and a better understanding of what professional anthropologists actually do.

Shakara Liddelow-Hunt, WDLAC